Robinson Crusoe- Emergence Of The Modern Self Essay

Essay, Research Paper

In the fresh Robinson Crusoe, Defoe illustrates the contradictions that drench the ideas and actions of adult male as he strives to make for God while besides forced to confront the realisation that he must guarantee his ain safety in the universe. Defoe uses Crusoe? s journey on the canoe to represent how Crusoe lives in a universe where he longs to delight and obey God but must besides postulate with his inherent aptitude, which looks to himself for his Jesus.

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In the transition in which Crusoe eventually reaches land after a disruptive experience at sea in his canoe, Crusoe falls to his? articulatio genuss and gave God Thanks for [ his ] Deliverance, deciding to put aside all Ideas of [ his ] Rescue by [ his ] boat? ( 103 ) . Crusoe strives for the Christian ideal, which is to look to God for aid and non to worlds because necessarily God holds the lone power to give and take life. Crusoe appears to accomplish the ideal when he drops to his articulatio genuss and thanks God for his safe return ; nevertheless, through the usage of the word? decide, ? Defoe shows that the ideal relationship with God contradicts adult male? s inherent aptitude. Harmonizing to the Webster? s English Dictionary, resolves means 1. to come to a definite or earnest determination about ; determine. 14. to come to a finding ; do up one? s head ( 786 ) . Since Crusoe must come to a finding in order to put aside his ideas that his boat saved him and non God so Defoe shows that Crusoe? s foremost replete is to look to his? ego? as his Jesus, and merely after deliberation does he find to name it Providence that saves him. Although it may on the surface appear that Crusoe achieves this ideal relationship with God in which he praises Him and does non look to himself as holding the power to salvage his ain life, Defoe shows that this is merely a superficial reading because Crusoe ne’er mentions that he does believe that God saved him but merely that he would non believe about his boat as salvaging him.

Crusoe says that he will claim

that God? s Providence saved him that twenty-four hours and delivered him back to land after the dangerous journey around the island, but the journey itself contradicts God? s Providence. The journey is an act against God. The intent of the journey in this semisynthetic canoe is for Crusoe to obtain more cognition. He says earlier in the novel that? the Discoveries I made in that small Journey, [ on land ] made me really eager to see other Partss of the Coast and now I had a Boat, I thought of nil but sailing round the island? ( 100 ) . Like the universe? s foremost adult male, Crusoe? s yearning for cognition about costs him his life. Crusoe? s island, like the Garden of Eden, provides for all of adult male? s demands. Crusoe has complete rule over this island and all of its dwellers, an island that provides for his every demand and holds no dangerous animal to terrorise him, yet he still longs to cognize the other parts of the island. Like Adam, after his hunt for cognition Crusoe must kip on the difficult cold land? being quite spent with the Labor and Fatigue of the Voyage? ( 103 ) . Before the autumn of adult male labour was non a beginning of weariness. Here Defoe reminds us that God punishes adult male who is non content with what God provides but alternatively opts to look to the ego for more than what God offers. Earlier in the novel Crusoe says that he? had neither the Lust of Flesh, the Lust of Eye, or the Pride of Life? ( 94 ) but this journey proves that he does so hold the Lust of the Eye because he longs for cognition.

Defoe uses Crusoe? s journey on the canoe to demo that Crusoe lives in a universe inflicted with contradictions, many of which he does non even know exist. In a one-sentence paragraph, Defoe illustrates this struggle between populating life harmonizing to the Bible and giving into inherent aptitude. Through his mention to the autumn of adult male, he shows that adult male? s nature is like Crusoe, whose quest for cognition and ungratefulness for what God provides leads to penalty, which finally leads adult male back to God.