Where The Girls Are Growing Up Female Essay

Where The Girls Are ; Turning Up Female With The Mass Media Essay, Research Paper

In Where the misss are: Turning Up Female With the Mass Media, Susan Douglas analyses the effects of mass media on adult females of the 19 1950ss, and more significantly on the adolescent misss of the babe roar epoch. Douglas explains why adult females have been torn in conflicting waies and are still fighting today to place themselves and their functions. Douglas recounts and dissects the equivocal messages imprinted on the feminine mind via the media. Douglas maintains that feminism is a direct consequence of the realisation that mass media is a deliberate and deliberate aggression against adult females. While the media apparently begins to admit the power of adult females, it intentionally sets out to redefine adult females and the qualities by which they should specify themselves. The contradictory messages received by adult females leave adult females non merely in a love/hate relationship with the media, but besides in a love/hate relationship with themselves.

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Equally early as the 19 1950ss adult females were identified and targeted as a market. In a consumer civilization the most of import things are consumers. Advertisers convinced housewifes that in order to be a & # 8220 ; good & # 8221 ; married woman and female parent you must hold their merchandises and contraptions to maintain a clean and perfect place. The sarcasm of this gambit is that consumers must hold money to purchase, and so seeking to better their quality as housewifes, away into the work force adult females went. This paradox left adult females overworked and unrealized. As the girls of the 1950ss and 1960ss witnessed this, they began to believe of better lives. They were born in great Numberss and as a consequence became the most powerful group of consumers. Advertisers shortly set the guidelines to what material commercial merchandises every miss needed to obtain her position in society. Women & # 8217 ; s functions on telecasting bit by bit changed from perfect homemakers to mystical jinnis and enchantresss with power, but someway they ever subdued their power to delight their work forces. In the background adult females

were contending for equal rights and equal wage, but the media portrayed these protests as stray events and Acts of the Apostless of extremists. The newscasts attempted to label women’s rightists as adult females who protested against being exploited and “looked at” by working themselves and in secret wanted men’s attending by these protests. Television did respond by developing a new “tougher” adult female, but made her success dependant on her attraction and gender. The media’s coincident publicity and containment of the women’s motion left the immature adult females of the 1970ss exposed to what Douglas refers to as societal schizophrenic disorder ( 9 ) . Feminist were now rejecting cosmetics and other marketed gambits that contributed to the subjugation of adult females, go forthing industries that were chiefly focused on women’s “needs” fighting to turn to this while keeping their market. Mass media encouraged and exploited commercial hermaphroditism with unisex manners and Madison Avenue promoted a new “natural look” that was anything but natural. This expression promoted a Lolita image that “infantilized adult females and exhorted [ adult females ] to encompass the desire to be attractive and gazed upon favourably by men.” ( 152 ) .

As telecasting shows and advertizers tried to incorporate adult females & # 8217 ; s self betterment to strictly personal and egotistic kingdoms, they still tell adult females today that we should look a certain manner, dress a certain manner, and move a certain manner. Womans today are still prey to the advertizers, to social outlooks, and dockets set by mass media. Torn between profession and maternity, by matrimony and liberty, slapped in the face with anorectic theoretical accounts by which they are supposed to estimate themselves, challenged to be sexy, yet virginal, adult females are still victims, yet someway care for this feminine being.

Susan Douglas expresses that even though adult females are still non immune to media influence, and that the guilt of non being up to criterion is still effectual, possibly the consciousness of the media use will alleviate the force per unit area and steer us to our true egos.